Your package gets bumped against others on the conveyors, some of which are as high as 10 feet above a
concrete floor
.  It may get dropped many times.  Being a smaller package, it will be at the top of a stack that is
moving at highways speeds, and will likely fall several times again before it reaches its destination.  It may be
transferred from one truck to another a few times - and they don't have time to treat everything gently .  When
the carrier arrives at your place of residence, your package may be either DROPPED or THROWN if no one is
there to watch.  Below are just two of many examples of the results of poor and irresponsible packaging:
Break down a GOOD, STRONG box and lay it out flat as shown.  You
will need to bend clean, tight and strong corners - so don't use thin
cardboard, or cardboard which is soft or worn from age or use.
AFTER making sure you have REMOVED ALL KNOBS, MOUNTING
BRACKETS, BEZELS -
ANYTHING PLASTIC UNLESS IT CONTAINS
THE TUNING DIAL -
position the unit on the cardboard as shown,
with the box' corrugations running from left to right.  The corrugations
will assist in bending clean, tight corners which will protect the unit.
Begin by wrapping the cardboard around the unit, then TAPE THE
UNIT TO THE CARDBOARD IN AT LEAST 3 PLACES to prevent the
unit from sliding inside the sleeve you're creating.   
If the unit has
one or more protruding steel bolts, press the cardboard down on the
bolt so the bolt pokes through - this will hold the unit in place even
better than the tape can - but STILL use the tape as backup support.
For the remainder of the wrapping process, ROLL THE UNIT ON THE
CARDBOARD, pressing down where the corners are created.  This
method will create a tighter corner, with less effort, than trying to wrap
the cardboard around the unit using your hands.  The tighter you can
make the corners, the more protection they will provide - especially
when you build up a few more tight corners on top of the first one.
I WILL
* REFUSE *
TO
SERVICE
A UNIT
PACKED
WITH SUCH
UTTER
CARELESS-
NESS
The laws of Physics
prevailed as the box
stopped and the unit
"stayed in motion".

This is the type of
job I will take photos
of to protect myself,
then send back
UNSERVICED at
the owner's cost.
The cost to
replace the 3
broken
controls was
more than the
customer was
prepared to
pay.  Thus, he
paid $35 to
get it back in
its broken
condition.  It
was a rare
unit from a
'69 GTO !
Packing Your Unit MY Way - ABSOLUTELY REQUIRED!
Your Car Unit MUST Be Packed This Way - NO EXCEPTIONS:
4783 N. Glenrosa Circle
Prescott Valley, AZ  86314


E-mail:  Barry8Track@cableone.net
.
This is a job I sent back unserviced,
too disruptive to overall workflow.
NOTE:  This customer did not remove
and keep his knobs AS REQUIRED !!
Step 1
Step 2
Step 3
Step 4
NOTE:  The cardboard only needs
to extend 3 to 4 inches from the
controls and does not have to be
quite as wide as that shown here.
Once you have 3 or 4 tightly wrapped and taped layers worth of "sleeve", the controls on your
radio are well protected AS LONG AS YOU PLACE THE RADIO IN THE BOX
HORIZONTALLY .
DO NOT PLACE THE RADIO IN THE BOX WITH THE CONTROLS FACING DOWN.
Just because an idea is "popular" doesn't mean it's a good idea -
dispelling  what is possibly the most dangerous myth of all:
Okay, I admit the
peanuts were
nice, but why - to
protect the solid
18 gauge steel
bottom cover ?
Click Here For My Phone Number
Many radio owners think that slipping short lengths of PVC pipe (or short lengths of stiff rubber hose) over the
control shafts is some kind of magical cure-all that will protect them - and these guys are
completely missing it.
They will tape these homemade sleeves over their control shafts, then throw the radio into a box with very little
or NO packing material - you can actually shake the box and feel the unit bouncing around against the sides and
bottom of the box - but HEY, everything should be just fine because they used this "great packing method".

So let's try a little experiment to see how well this method works.  I have created some animations below that will
show you beyond any doubt that this is one of the WORST ways to pack a radio.  The "protective" sleeves only
create a false sense of security as it makes guys think they don't have to provide adequate packing material, and
since a large target is easier to hit than a small target, all this does is make it EASIER to damage the controls as
it makes them effectively LARGER (control shaft plus PVC sleeve equals MORE EXPOSED AREA to bump against).

Now, let's take a close look at what happens if your box falls off of a 10 foot high conveyor at the shipping center.
In accordance with the laws of Physics and the formula  [ 32.2 feet per second PER SECOND ] dictating the speed
of a falling object, your package keeps moving faster and faster as it falls, until it suddenly hits the concrete floor.
Though my animations are not exactly to scale in this regard, some increase in speed as it falls can still be noted:
Even if we are
EXTREMELY lucky
and the box falls
straight as shown
which would result
in only a direct
FRONTAL impact
(which is the only
scenario the radio
owner is thinking
about), two lengths
of PVC pipe do not
offer nearly enough
distribution of the
impact forces.  The
result of this is that
the radio's front
panel can collapse
at the points where
the PVC meets the
panel, causing the
controls to be
pushed back inside.
Concrete Floor
This is the MUCH
more accurate
scenario, with the
box spinning as it
falls.  So now, not
only do we have
the box falling
faster and faster
with distance,
we ALSO have
the spinning
motion which
adds LATERAL
force to the force
already present
when the box
falls on one of
its corners.  This
bends the control,
destroying it as
they cannot be
straightened
without breaking.
Concrete Floor
Okay my friends, hopefully I have successfully steered you away from this silly idea.

When you unpack a brand spankin' new piece of gear which has delicate protruding
control shafts - for that matter ANYTHING delicate and protruding, what do they have
around these protrusions?  
AIR !  Nothing but 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen, 0.93%
argon, 0.04% carbon dioxide, trace amounts of other gases and a little water vapor.

Any type of solid material in this area will accomplish only one thing:  To transfer
SHOCK AND IMPACT directly from the box to the delicate items in question, and that
is ALL it will do.  How can anything striking an object be less harmful than AIR ?  Of
course, the simple fact is that it can't.  So let's move on to MY packing method, which
has been used on more than 1000 units with
ZERO INCIDENTS OF DAMAGE on arrival.
Click Here For My Phone Number
Units arriving with broken controls or tuner pushbuttons from careless or improper packing will be RETURNED UNSERVICED
with a refund (if prepaid) MINUS my return shipping cost AND a 30.00 fee for wasting my time.  I speak for ALL classic car radio
shops when I say careless packing is OUR BIGGEST, NUMBER ONE PET PEEVE AND
A THREAT TO THE ENTIRE INDUSTRY !

NO ONE MAKES NEW REPLACEMENT CONTROLS FOR THE HUNDREDS OF MODELS OUT THERE, AND NO ONE EVER WILL !
The only replacement, in almost all cases, is from a similar model - or to spend half a day hoping we have parts to rebuild it.  You
might find "gentle" references to this on the websites of other shops, but I'm coming right out and DEMANDING that units are
packed MY WAY, or leave this website right now and give someone else the headache and lost productive time.  If my stern rules,
demands, warnings and penalties cause you to take your business elsewhere, all I will say is "Thank you" for doing that !

If everyone sent in their units carelessly packed, the classic car radio industry would be reduced to a giant heap of
junk units.
WE would all be out our jobs, and YOU would be driving around sporting a cheap piece of Chinese junk with an LED tuning dial,
the electronics of which are so unreliable that I
TERMINATED MY DEALERSHIP with one of the companies that puts them out.

Now, before I illustrate how to pack it, let's go over how NOT to pack it:

DO NOT immerse your unit in peanuts without  FIRST putting it into ITS OWN INTERNAL BOX.  Peanuts are not water,
and will try to stop your radio from moving.  
A control shaft resting directly against peanuts will bend if box is dropped.

DO NOT listen to anyone's packing advice except MINE - I'm the one who loses the job if the unit arrives damaged.
There are too many well-meaning advisors who don't see the big picture or know the laws of Physics.

DO NOT attempt to protect the controls by putting ANYTHING on them.  My method provides ABSOLUTE protection.
DO NOT use a block of styrofoam with holes for the controls - this is another popular but BAD idea.

If including other items for me to check such as dash mounted faders, external power amp sections, MPX adaptors,
crossover/mixer boxes, etc.  DO NOT just throw them into the box - they need their own internal boxes also.  The
dash
mounted faders are especially fragile
, with replacements extremely hard to find because they are the wirewound type.

DO NOT send the unit's original box or anything you will want back.  Boxes and packing materials are DISCARDED.

DO NOT SEND YOUR KNOBS, MOUNTING HARDWARE OR DECORATIVE COWLS - I AM NOT
LIABLE FOR LOSS OR DAMAGE TO ANYTHING NOT NEEDED FOR TEST AND REPAIR.  YOU
WILL BE SIGNING A DOCUMENT
ABSOLVING ME OF ALL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THESE ITEMS.
IDIOT !!  I'LL
NEVER FIND A
REPLACEMENT FOR
THIS CONTROL !!
CAN YOU STILL
HAVE IT READY
FOR NEXT WEEK'S
CAR SHOW ?
2016 "Less than Perfect Packing" Award Winner
Not only did this customer "conveniently" fail to mention that his tuner was in at least 6 pieces when
asking for a price quote over the phone, his packing method did not even allow the pushbuttons to
extend their full length in the box, causing  more damage.  He paid PLENTY for work shown  
HERE
Guys !  GUYS !!  When the UPS driver clocks in, there ISN'T a sticky note on his time card saying "Be especially careful with
John's package - it's a rare classic car radio - and make sure you pass the word to every other driver until it reaches John's
house".  The driver DOESN'T nurse your package in his lap between stops, and he DOESN'T gingerly saunter up my driveway
holding your package perfectly level and singing "The Best of Bread" to it before gently lowering to my warehouse floor at the
maximum allowable rate of 6 inches per second (slower at sea level to counter the increased atmospheric pressure on it).
Watch this video !  It opens in a new browser so you don't lose your place here:  VIDEO
Final "Safe Packing" Checklist
1.  All knobs, cowls, bezels (except for that containing the tuning dial) and mounting brackets are removed.

2.  Your contact information is affixed to ALL items in the box.

3.  EVERY ITEM included is in its own separate box - NOTHING is swimming loose in peanuts.

4.  MOST IMPORTANT:  
Anything with protruding controls is encased in my protective cardboard sleeve.

5.  Radio, inside its protective sleeve, is placed HORIZONTALLY in the box - NOT with the controls facing down !

6.  Because the protective sleeve overhangs the controls, there is NO packing material against the controls.

7.  There is at least 3 inches of padding on all sides, top and bottom.  NOTHING is touching the box walls.

8.  When you shake the box, you don't hear anything rattling or moving around.  IF ANYTHING CAN MOVE,
IT MUST BE PACKED BETTER.  Add more packing material until it cannot move around when shaken.

9.  The Work Order is filled out completely and ALL 9 PAGES ARE INCLUDED - NOT JUST THE PAGES WITH
  SPACES TO FILL OUT.  The rest of the pages are parts of a contract you are agreeing to.

10.  Once all these criteria are met, the box is ready to send.  Send your package to:
If you forgot any of the steps below, don't call or write me to ask if it's okay.  IT'S NOT OKAY.
There is a good and very necessary reason for ALL steps of the packing process.  If you
forgot any of these steps and requirements, YOU MUST CORRECT IT BEFORE SENDING IT.
Before packing your unit, please print and fill out a Work Order.  When you click on the Work Order link below,
it will open in a separate browser so you don't lose your place on this page.  When finished printing the Work
Order, simply clear away the new browsers which will again reveal this page.  Click here for the
WORK ORDER
4783 N. Glenrosa Circle
Prescott Valley, AZ  86314

(My address is also on the last page of the Work Order, and can be cut out and used as a
shipping label if desired.  ALL pages of the Work Order MUST be included.)